Scholarship

Give children and their families the opportunity to break free from the vicious cycle of poverty. Through our Education Grant program , kids go to school and parents learn to read and write too.

The Benefits:

1. Uniforms, stationery, transport to school and recess

2. Weekly tutorial classes

3. Faith formation, Life Skills & Values Sessions

4. Follow up with school teachers on student’s performance

5. Consistent monitoring of results

6. Parents’ Suport Group: Engaging parents in the lives of their kids

How much is it to sponsor a child?

Elementary school USD330/420 a year

High school USD480/SGD620 a year

College SGD3200 a year

 

Who do we serve?

Children and Teens from Payatas and Erap City with consistent good results, are in need of financial assistance and are willing to work hard.

*Jacob was a dumpstruck assistant (palero) who wanted nothing more in life than to put on a uniform and go to school with other boys his age. But Jacob had other things to worry about like earning money to provide for his siblings. They could barely get by on 3 meals a week! School was only a dream he didn’t think would be possible. When Jacob heard of the scholarship being offered, he came forward. That was 5 years ago. Jacob was 11 then and started Grade 2, a dream come true. Today he is in Grade 5. He has been consistently top in the level and will be taking the ALS exams this October to qualify for high school.

While other kids were out playing, *Annie had to stay home to cook, wash the clothes, keep the house clean and care for her 3 younger siblings. Her parents work as scavengers in the dumpsite. They were not sure about sending Annie to Grade 1. After all they could not afford getting her any uniform or shoes. They could not afford to send her to school. She would have to walk almost half an hour if she wanted to get to school. And during recess what would she eat? They couldnt afford a snack. They had bills to pay and other children to feed. Today Annie is in Grade Six and about to graduate from elementary school. She can’t wait to get to high school and her sponsor is determined that this child will finish her education.

*Mila was in Cavite working as a housekeeper when she received a text message from her younger sister one day. “Can you come back home? Acts29 is asking to interview you for college.” Mila’s heart skipped a beat. In high school she was one of the top students in her level. Her father worked as a pedicab driver earning less than $5 a day barely enough to support 8 children. Mila knew what she had to do once she graduated from high school, work as a maid to support her younger siblings.  That weekend Mila returned home and was interviewed by acts29. She expressed her desire to help her family and her interest in accounting. She joined acts29 as an intern for 1 year learning to use the computer and picked up MS Office skills. She learnt basic financial management, making reports and running projects. She spent the afternoons working on essays, algebra and preparing for college entrance exams. Today *Mila is a 2nd year accounting student in Adamson University. She is excels in her studies and is a mentor to the younger scholars of acts29.

Challenges in the family 

Many of the parents we serve have not completed elementary or high school. They do not have birth certificates or there is an error in their name on official documents (like birth certificate). Hence they cannot apply for a Postal ID or open a bank account. Essential requirements to secure a full-time job. As such they can only do low paying work, with an estimate income of less than $150 a month. This is barely enough for food and utilities. They would be in debt if any family member were to fall sick. Although education is free in the Philippines, it costs an average of $30 a month to send a child to school with uniform, shoes, bag, ID, test papers, stationery, notebooks, materials for projects, biscuits for recess and transport. Many children also do not have the proper documents to enrol in school. Without a birth certificate, they cannot enrol in a school.